“When markets become more competitive, prices fall,” says Moskowitz, who was rooting for perennial disappointment England in last Wednesday’s match, because one side of his family is English. He’s typically more hard-headed when he thinks about sports, as shown in the 2011 bestseller “Scorecasting” that he co-authored with Sports Illustrated writer Jon Wertheim, applying economic analysis to sports. A popular working paper by Moskowitz studied sports betting markets for the asset pricing anomalies that we know and love in financial markets.

During the offseason of a specific sport, most bettors just switch gears and focus on the active sports. They figure they can just “catch up” on the offseason later. Meanwhile, if you are keeping up with daily happenings, personnel changes, prospect development, transactions, etc., on a year-round basis, you will have a huge advantage over the public (and maybe even some sportsbooks as well).
Straight-up bets, also known as the moneyline, are picks that are made on one club triumphing over the other. If Manchester City is playing Watford, in order to make a moneyline wager you’d need to pick one of those clubs to win. If you choose Man City and they do win, you’d win your moneyline bet. If the inverse happens and Watford wins, you’d lose your moneyline bet.
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