On the flip side, I bet sports as basically a second income. I am very thankful to have a job in engineering that affords me the opportunity to bet enough to accomplish this and leaves me a safety net to lose what I put in and be okay. Just an example is for college football season this year (2018), I put in $10,000 for the regular season. I can do what I want within the season with that but will not buy back in. I also will never exceed $10,000 in bets at one time. My account will always be viewed as having $10,000 during this season because I never want to bet more because I have won and have profits. That is a common problem for gamblers and it really is difficult to avoid the thought of well I can make so much more if I bet this much more. It is 100% true that money management is the most important aspect of sports betting. If you can’t do this well, you may get into serious financial trouble at worst, and less important but still relevant, you will not be able to beat the sports books constantly or over time without understanding which bets make sense by realizing how much to bet, which lines to bet and which matchups offer the highest win and payout percentages. Most hobby betters bet based on how much they can win in a bet, a handicapper or shark bets where they are getting the best odds for their money. Maybe they don’t even believe in the team to win, but if the value makes sense, they will wager on it because it makes sense financially. So an example is you have $2000 and want to bet on at most two games. The average person would tend to bet on as many outcomes as possible but in this case would take two teams and we will say standard line of -110. What has happened is that you have really damaged your chance of making a profit on this bet. This is due to beginning each matchup with a basic, implied odds of 52.38% which means you have this % chance to win one game. This comes from the line of -110 (if it was -100 or even odds, you would have a 50% chance to win) which converts to 1.91 decimal odds. You divide 1 (one bet) by the decimal % (1/1.91) and get 52.38%. So on two games, at -110, you will have 13/5 fractional odds (just an example here) to win or 2.6 decimal odds so you should divide 1 by 2.6 which gives you 38.46% implied odds to win both bets. What would the bets pay out? Win one at $1000 with -110 (1.91 decimal odds so 1.91*1000=payout) and you get $909.09 profit from the win and a total back of $1909.09 with your bet amount returned. So maybe you can see why 2 bets wouldn’t be a great investment. If not, here’s why. Say you win just 1 of the two matchups, you get the payout of $1909.09 so you have lost money on your bets for the day. And with only a 38% chance to win (usually will be a little less maybe a little more depending on the odds and line) both bets and taking $1818.18 in profits, you are not going to beat those percentages over time which is the only thing that matters to a professional bettor. Putting all of your money on one outcome offers the best chance to win and the same payout amount so obviously you are getting a better return on your money and will have a better chance to walk away with a profit at season’s end. So this is a very simplistic example and doesn’t take into account lines or the options of taking the points for an underdog with a decent positive moneyline. Just a rule to state here: never bet more than you can afford to lose or care about losing.
He had a clean sheet, plus one save, at AEK Athens two weeks ago. I think another clean sheet at home is very likely, and hopefully Neuer will pick up a save or two as well. AEK do have 25 shots, and eight on target, in their first three games. I also considered Alisson of Liverpool, but he didn't have to make a single save two weeks ago, and Red Star Belgrade have only taken 15 shots, the lowest total in the competition.
In the United States, it was previously illegal under the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 for states to authorize legal sports betting, hence making it effectively illegal. The states of Delaware, Montana, Nevada, and Oregon—which had pre-existing sports lotteries and sports betting frameworks, were grandfathered and exempted from the effects of the Act.[6]
The cost of my College football service is $895, the cost of the NFL service is $995 ($1,595 for both services), my Basketball service is $895 ($2,195 for all Football and Dr. Bob’s Basketball service), and the NBA Guru subscription is well worth the $1495 given how profitable he’s been ($3,295 for all Football and all Basketball, including the NBA Guru). You must factor in that cost when calculating your expected return on investment (ROI). As explained above, winning 55% on the Football Best Bets and 53.5% on my Basketball Best Bets would yield an expected profit of +45.5 Stars and let’s assume the NBA Guru profits +27.2 Stars as well (he’s averaged +27.2 Stars per season). Let’s say you decide to play 1.0% of your initial bankroll per star on the Football Best Bets and NBA Guru Best Bets and 0.8% per star on the Basketball Best Bets, as in the example above. Doing so would have an expected total return 68.0% per year based on flat-betting using your initial bankroll. Using an optimal betting strategy, as explained in the advanced money management section, would yield even higher long term returns while protecting the downside risk in the inevitable negative variance seasons that plague even the best long term handicappers.

On our Picks page, you’ll notice dollar signs, ATS, To Win and Total O/U. These are all betting terms that you should familiarize yourself with in order to make strategic picks. Under the Last 100 heading, you’ll see the records for the last 100 games played in the Premier League. The table also features the amount of money won (or lost) based on the opening and closing lines, ATS and Total O/U. It may seem like gibberish but don’t worry, we’ll explain each term below.  
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